Posted by: bluesyemre | December 28, 2015

Lost Memory – #Libraries and #archives destroyed in the 20th century

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The library at Holland House in London, England, mostly destroyed by the German blitz in September 1940.

 

Every year, precious fragments, if not whole chunks of the world documentary heritage, disappear through “natural” causes: acidified paper that crumbles to dust, leather, parchment, film and magnetic tape attacked by light, heat, humidity or dust. As well as natural causes, accidents regularly afflict libraries and archives. Floods, fires, hurricanes, storms, earthquakes… the list goes on of disasters which are difficult to guard against except by taking preventive measures. Every year, treasures are destroyed by fire and other extreme weather conditions such as cyclones, monsoons. It would take a very long time to compile a list of all the libraries and archives destroyed or seriously damaged by acts of war, bombardment and fire, whether deliberate or accidental. No list has yet been drawn up of the holdings or collections already lost or endangered. The Library of Alexandria is probably the most famous historical example, but how many other known and unknown treasures have vanished in Constantinople, Warsaw, Florence, or more recently in Bucharest, Saint Petersburg and Sarajevo? Sadly the list cannot be closed. There are so many more, not to mention holdings dispersed following the accidental or deliberate displacement of archives and libraries. The present document, prepared within the framework of the “Memory of the World” Programme, under contract with ICA and IFLA, by J. van Albada and H. van der Hoeven, is an attempt to list major disasters that have destroyed or caused irreparable damage during this century to libraries and archives, whether written or audiovisual. The most endangered carriers are not necessarily the oldest. In the audio domain substantial numbers of acetate discs and tapes are lost each year. The world of film was the first to become aware of the decay of the polymers used to record sounds and images. War, in particular the two world wars, caused considerable losses, numerous libraries and archives have been destroyed or badly damaged in the course of fighting, notably in France, Germany, Italy and Poland. War has also been the source of untold destruction to libraries and archives in the former Yugoslavia since 1991. Shelling by gunners of the National and University Library of Bosnia and Herzegovina started a fire that burned down the building and destroyed most of the collections. Many books in the library had been salvaged from collections in libraries that were damaged during World War II. This document is not meant to be a sort of funerary monument, but is intended to alert public opinion and sensitize the professional community and local and national authorities to the disappearance of archival and library treasures of inestimable value and to draw attention to the urgent need to safeguard endangered documentary heritage all over the world. Librarians and archivists work hard to anticipate and prevent disasters affecting their holdings. Yet, even as the end of the 20th century approaches, it appears that documentary heritage housed in the world’s libraries and archives always remains at risk. Let us move into the 21st century with renewed commitment to protecting the “Memory of the World” through disaster planning, through vigilance and through the pursuit of world peace.

http://www.unesco.org/webworld/mdm/administ/pdf/LOSTMEMO.PDF


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