Posted by: bluesyemre | September 3, 2018

The Kavli Prize (A partnership between The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, The Kavli Foundation (United States), and The Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research)

FredMedal_announcement

The Kavli Prize is a partnership between The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, The Kavli Foundation (United States), and The Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research.

The Kavli Prizes recognize scientists for pioneering advances in our understanding of existence at its biggest, smallest, and most complex scales. Presented every two years in the fields of astrophysics, nanoscience and neuroscience, each of three international prizes consists of $1 million (U.S.). Laureates are chosen by committees whose members  are recommended by six of the world’s most renowned science societies and academies. Winners receive gold medals in Oslo, Norway, in a ceremony presided over by His Majesty King Harald. A banquet takes place at Oslo’s famed City Hall.

First awarded in 2008, the Kavli Prizes have so far honored 40 scientists from eight countries − the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Japan, Norway, Russia, Sweden and Switzerland,  In 2016, Ronald W.P. Drever (U.S),  Kip S. Thorne (U.S.) and Rainer Weiss (U.S.) shared the Kavli Prize in Astrophysics “for the direct detection of gravitational waves”; Gerd Binnig (Switzerland), Christoph Gerber (Switzerland) and Calvin Quate (U.S.) shared the Kavli Prize in Nanoscience “for the invention and realization of atomic force microscopy, a breakthrough in measurement technology and nanosculpting that continues to have a transformative impact on nanoscience and technology”; and Eve Marder (U.S.), Michael Merzenich (U.S.) and Carla Shatz (U.S.) shared the Kavli Prize in Neuroscience  “for the discovery of mechanisms that allow experience and neural activity to remodel brain function.”

Past awards have honored scientists for research ranging from the discovery of the Kuiper Belt to creating unprecedented methods for controlling matter on the nanoscale, to deepening our understanding of the basic neuronal mechanisms underlying perception and decision. In 2012, Mildred S. Dresselhaus (U.S.) became the first sole winner of a Kavli Prize, receiving it for her pioneering contributions to nanoscience.

The Kavli Prize is a partnership between The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, The Kavli Foundation (U.S.), and The Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research. It is named after Fred Kavli, a Norwegian-born U.S. philanthropist and founder of The Kavli Foundation.

http://kavliprize.org/


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